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Description: A gorgeously lighted photo, taken by Dallas Kilponen, of Nicola Scott, at a light box, drawing Secret Six, in her home in Potts Point.


 Nicola Scott’s interview.


 Best quotes in the article? These: 


 “…NICOLA SCOTT knows how to do sexy. The Sydney artist, one of the rising stars of American superhero comics, came to prominence for her work on Birds Of Prey, a popular DC Comic about a mostly female team of superheroes. “Pretty hot chicks,” she laughs, proudly.

In less enlightened times, when comics were blamed for practically every perceived problem of youth, Scott could well have been accused of drawing idealised women to fulfil adolescent male fantasies.

"I think that’s how a lot of them are created and designed," she says. "And I do stylise my characters. I do make my superhero characters, female or male, tall. I give them longer legs. I give them longer necks. On purpose, we’ve made them sexy."

The world of superheroes, she believes, is a mostly innocent place - and that’s as it should be. “Superman shouldn’t be sexy. If he’s been drawn sexy, he’s been drawn wrong. Batman can be a little sexy, but you don’t want to put him in high-cut pants. Nightwing [formerly Robin] is allowed to be sexy because he’s younger and he’s single and he’s not one of the Trinity.”

…By “the Trinity”, she means Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman, who have been DC’s three flagship characters for over 60 years. And Wonder Woman?

"Well here’s the thing," says Scott. "She’s allowed to be sexy because she’s a woman in a bikini, and there are a lot of male readers; but I don’t think Wonder Woman is meant to be sexy. She’s beautiful and has a flesh-baring outfit, but I don’t think she should stand like she’s sexy."

Wonder Woman is Scott’s favourite superhero, the one who led her into comics. A handful of Australian artists have broken into this very competitive business, but Scott, 37, is probably the most successful so far.

…She is not what you might expect. As a child she was never a fan of comics. Her love of superheroes stemmed from television, especially the 1970s Wonder Woman television series starring Lynda Carter.

"It was this hot chick in a great outfit, throwing people around, and I just thought that was awesome," she says…"

Description: A gorgeously lighted photo, taken by Dallas Kilponen, of Nicola Scott, at a light box, drawing Secret Six, in her home in Potts Point.

Nicola Scott’s interview.

Best quotes in the article? These:

“…NICOLA SCOTT knows how to do sexy. The Sydney artist, one of the rising stars of American superhero comics, came to prominence for her work on Birds Of Prey, a popular DC Comic about a mostly female team of superheroes. “Pretty hot chicks,” she laughs, proudly.

In less enlightened times, when comics were blamed for practically every perceived problem of youth, Scott could well have been accused of drawing idealised women to fulfil adolescent male fantasies.

"I think that’s how a lot of them are created and designed," she says. "And I do stylise my characters. I do make my superhero characters, female or male, tall. I give them longer legs. I give them longer necks. On purpose, we’ve made them sexy."

The world of superheroes, she believes, is a mostly innocent place - and that’s as it should be. “Superman shouldn’t be sexy. If he’s been drawn sexy, he’s been drawn wrong. Batman can be a little sexy, but you don’t want to put him in high-cut pants. Nightwing [formerly Robin] is allowed to be sexy because he’s younger and he’s single and he’s not one of the Trinity.”

…By “the Trinity”, she means Superman, Batman and Wonder Woman, who have been DC’s three flagship characters for over 60 years. And Wonder Woman?

"Well here’s the thing," says Scott. "She’s allowed to be sexy because she’s a woman in a bikini, and there are a lot of male readers; but I don’t think Wonder Woman is meant to be sexy. She’s beautiful and has a flesh-baring outfit, but I don’t think she should stand like she’s sexy."

Wonder Woman is Scott’s favourite superhero, the one who led her into comics. A handful of Australian artists have broken into this very competitive business, but Scott, 37, is probably the most successful so far.

…She is not what you might expect. As a child she was never a fan of comics. Her love of superheroes stemmed from television, especially the 1970s Wonder Woman television series starring Lynda Carter.

"It was this hot chick in a great outfit, throwing people around, and I just thought that was awesome," she says…"

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